Quarantine Diary Day 197: Allergic to Reality

The only reason I don’t have tattoos is because I’m too much of a wuss to get them. I don’t care about the pain; I’m afraid of an untreatable allergic reaction. I’m afraid my skin will reject the ink. True allergic reactions to colors other than red are fairly uncommon, I realize, but I also realize by now that I’m one of those annoying highly sensitive persons who can’t just do things that other people do without thinking. I knew I was allergic to nickel when I went to the tattoo shop with a group of kids from my dorm at eighteen, knew it bodily from six years of battling itchy, inflamed earlobes and an itchy stomach, too, when I wore a belt too tight and the buckle rubbed against my skin, but I went ahead and pierced my belly button anyway and hoped for the best. I suffered, of course. I treated the fresh piercing according to the shop’s instructions and hoped the hot, crusty holes above my navel would heal into something cute, but when my I saw my friend had a glittering playboy bunny peeking out under her babydoll t-shirt and no signs of infection whatsoever, I had to admit that mine didn’t look anything like hers and, also, I was miserable. There is no relief like pulling a surgical steel barbell topped on either end with fake rubies out of a wound of your own making. There is no relief like giving up on something your body is rejecting. 

Heavy metals aren’t the only substances that make my body go haywire. Pet a cat or walk into a room with a guinea pig and my eyes will itch for hours. Inhale deeply in the fall and spring and I’ll cough like I’ve got COVID. Drink caffeine after three p.m. and I’m not just sleepless, I’m shaking and scared. Swallow ten mg hydrocodone and I start thinking like a junkie. More to the point of this post, I also have atopic dermatitis and keratosis pilaris and cystic acne and probably three or four other conditions that could be lumped under the rubric of “bad skin.” 

I’ve done a fair amount of research. I’ve contacted artists and shops, analyzed ingredient lists, looked into vegan and organic inks, and read scientific abstracts and posts going back over a decade on tattoo message boards. I’ve tried to come at the decision from every angle and even gone as far as scheduling appointments and putting down deposits, but I always end up in the same spot. Given the circumstances of my body, injecting ink into my skin with a metal needle seems, at best, like a foolish thing to do.

You’d think, with this self-knowledge, I’d stop revisiting the question of whether or not to get a tattoo, stop following artists on Instagram, stop looking at my own body as a canvas. The problem is, I so enjoy the inhabiting the archetype of the fool. The fool, with her bindle and her little white dog and the sun shining bright as she moves to step off the cliff of everything she knows into the wild unknown, is always on the cusp of a new adventure. The fool is someone I so rarely get to be in my professional life or as the parent of a young child (though perhaps I am foolish in both arenas more often than I care to admit). The fool is someone none of us get to be in this political moment, as we are being duped by trickster magicians and ruled by emperors with all the power and no clothes and devils with their chains that shine so pretty until you realize they’ve got you around the neck.  

I want tattoos, though. I want a short phrase from the Book of Mormon on my left forearm, a beehive on my right shoulder blade, a seagull on my right tricep, an illustration of Frog from Arnold Lobel’s beloved Frog and Toad on my left quad, a saguaro cactus on my left inner bicep and an anchor on the right, and I want whatever strikes my fancy after that. 

I want tattoos like I want to go on vacation and play board games with friends and go to a bar and get real close to someone without a mask. Of course I’m not going to do any of those things until the science says I can. I want to be the fool but only with the promise of no more lessons to learn.